Today's (10/31/2014) New Book Releases on History

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Ancient Irrigation Systems of the Aral Sea Area: The History, Origin, and Development of Irrigated Agriculture (American School of Prehistoric Research Monographs) by B. V. Adrianov - 300 pages
Ancient Irrigation Systems in the Aral Sea Area, is the English translation of Boris Vasilevich Andrianov's work, Drevnie orositelnye sistemy priaralya , concerning the study of ancient irrigation systems and the settlement pattern in the historical region of Khorezm, south of the Aral Sea (Uzbekistan). This work holds a special place within the Soviet archaeological school because of the results obtained through a multidisciplinary approach combining aerial survey and fieldwork, surveys, and excavations. This translation has been enriched by the addition of introductions written by several eminent scholars from the region regarding the importance of the Khorezm Archaeological-Ethnographic Expedition and the figure of Boris V. Andrianov and his landmark study almost 50 years after the original publication.
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A City from the Dawn of History: Erbil in the Cuneiform Sources by John MacGinnis - 148 pages
The city of Erbil, which now claims to be one of the oldest continually inhabited cities in the world, lies on the rich alluvial plains at the foot of the piedmont of the Zagros mountains in a strategic position which from the earliest times made it a natural gateway between Iran and Mesopotamia. Within the context of ancient Mesopotamian civilisation there can be no doubt that it will have been one of the most important urban centres. Yet while the citadel of Erbil is without question a site of exceptional interest, archaeologically the mound has until recently remained virtually untouched. On the other hand rich documentation allows us to understand the context in which the city grew and flourished. This work is dedicated to the cuneiform sources. Together these include hundreds of documents stretching from the late third millennium to the mid first millennium BC. The very first references, in administrative documents from the archives of the royal palace at Ebla, date to ca. 2300 BC. In the eras that follow texts written in Sumerian and then Akkadian attest to the city's periods of independence alternating with its incorporation in the Ur III, Assyrian and Babylonian empires. From the Achaemenid period, while the Elamite texts from Persepolis are mostly unpublished, Erbil does appear both in the famous inscription of Darius I at Behistun and in the celebrated Passport of Nehtihur, an Aramaic document from Elephantine in Egypt. The sources include a wide variety of administrative texts, royal inscriptions, grants, chronicles, letters, votive dedications and oracular pronouncements which together give a unique insight into the history and society of this exceptional city.
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The Problem with Multiculturalism: The Uniqueness and Universality of Western Civilization by John M. Headley - 122 pages

The horrors of the past century have done little to advance appreciation for the virtues of Western civilization. Criticism of the West has mounted and the West itself has lost sight of its uniqueness. Westerners tend to endow other societies with liberal philosophy and practices. While politically profitable, this fails to educate these societies about their own civilizations’ contributions to the idea of a common humanity, human rights, and the legitimacy of dissent and diversity.

John M. Headley argues for the West’s uniqueness and universality, while critiquing multiculturalism’s failure to recognize these special characteristics. He looks to civilization rather than to the nation-state as the source of the West’s achievements, arguing that its uniqueness was evident from its beginnings.

Headley also seeks to advance the ever-contentious discussion about secularization. He sees secularization as a neutralizing force regarding the religions of other civilizations, allowing them to accept Western influence, which thus becomes universal. To understand secularization and how it operates from a naturalistic perspective, one must see civilization itself as a defining element in world affairs.

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Proceedings Of The 5th Conference Of The Societas Iranologica Europaea: Vol. I. Ancient & Middle Iranian Studies by Antonio Panaino - 762 pages
Proceedings of the 5th conference of the Societas Iranologica Europaea held in Ravenna, 6-11 October 2003. The new publication series, opened by the present volume, has the ambition to fill a gap in the research landscape in the field of Asian Studies. In spite of the considerable development of comparative and contrastive research into Indo-Iranian languages and civilizations, and notwithstanding the general trend to interdisciplinarity in the studies of the multicultural areas of Central Asia, of Iran maior, of the Indian subcontinent and the surrounding territories, we still miss a forum for publications in the sphere of Philology, Cultural and Social History, with a special focus on the topics and regions in question. Therefore we would like to establish the Indo-Iranica series as a deliberately large as well as thematically and methodologically open framework of scholarly discussions, in which both monographs and miscellaneous volumes on relevant subjects may find their place. The special ‘Series purpurea’, moreover, will unite selected writings of leading scholars, who have decisively enriched the research fields mentioned above, both by the results of their studies and by new (meta)methodological perspectives they have created.
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Proceedings Of The 5th Conference Of The Societas Iranologica Europaea: Vol. II. Classical & Contemporary Iranian Studies by Antonio Panaino - 555 pages
Proceedings of the 5th conference of the Societas Iranologica Europaea held in Ravenna, 6-11 October 2003. The new publication series, opened by the present volume, has the ambition to fill a gap in the research landscape in the field of Asian Studies. In spite of the considerable development of comparative and contrastive research into Indo-Iranian languages and civilizations, and notwithstanding the general trend to interdisciplinarity in the studies of the multicultural areas of Central Asia, of Iran maior, of the Indian subcontinent and the surrounding territories, we still miss a forum for publications in the sphere of Philology, Cultural and Social History, with a special focus on the topics and regions in question. Therefore we would like to establish the Indo-Iranica series as a deliberately large as well as thematically and methodologically open framework of scholarly discussions, in which both monographs and miscellaneous volumes on relevant subjects may find their place. The special ‘Series purpurea’, moreover, will unite selected writings of leading scholars, who have decisively enriched the research fields mentioned above, both by the results of their studies and by new (meta)methodological perspectives they have created.
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Patronage, Production, and Transmission of Texts in Medieval and Early Modern Jewish Cultures (Medieval Church Studies) by Esperanza Alfonso - 370 pages
Medieval and early modern cultural history has witnessed a recent shift from the study of manuscripts and early printed books as vehicles of texts and images towards their study as cultural objects in their own right. Rather than focusing solely on original authorship, scholars have turned to subjects such as the patronage, production, circulation, and consumption of texts. Codicological features, annotations, glosses, ownership notes, deeds of sale, and other traces have revealed countless insights into the social worlds of texts - their patrons, producers, and readers.

This book contributes to this area of scholarship with respect to Jewish texts and Jewish social contexts by focusing on select cases in the production of Bibles, Haggadot, religious poetry, and translations of and commentaries on scripture in the Eastern and Western Mediterranean between the tenth and sixteenth centuries. Individual essays consider models of patron-client relationships, interconfessional patronage scenarios, manuscript production through 'multiple hands', the (incomplete) transition from manuscript production to printed books, and relationships among text, image, and reader as suggested by codicological features.
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Bruno the Carthusian and his Mortuary Roll: Studies, Text, and Translation (Europa Sacra) by Hartmut Beyer - 306 pages
As founder of the Carthusian order, Saint Bruno of Cologne (å 1101) is known as a leading figure in the twelfth-century religious renewal. As recent research has emphasized, he was also one of the first proponents of a new intellectual culture of the French schools as a teacher at Reims before his conversion and retreat to the Italian hermitage of La Torre.



Various contrary aspects of his life are commemorated in his mortuary roll, a unique document that was sent around churches and monasteries of Europe upon his death by his fledgling hermit community. Over 150 entries by individuals and monastic or clerical communities in Italy, France, and England, mostly in verse, survive in an early sixteenth-century text witness.



In celebrating Bruno's life and saintly death, the many-voiced entries comment upon intellectual and religious ideals, illustrating literary practices and intellectual and spiritual values as well as the pragmatic workings of memoria. The present edition includes all materials accompanying the sole surviving sixteenth-century print of the roll. It offers complete translations into English and into German, and includes five studies by experts debating the most important aspects and contexts of this singular and multi-faceted medieval text.
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Devotional Culture in Late Medieval England and Europe: Diverse Imaginations of Christ's Life (Medieval Church Studies) by Stephen Kelly - 610 pages
Christ's life, as related through the Gospel narratives and early Apocrypha, was subject to a riot of literary-devotional adaptation in the medieval period. This collection provides a series of groundbreaking studies centring on the devotional and cultural significance of Christianity's pivotal story during the Middle Ages.

The collection represents an important milestone in terms of mapping the meditative modes of piety that characterize a number of Christological traditions, including the Meditationes vitae Christi and the numerous versions it spawned in both Latin and the vernacular. A number of chapters in the volume track how and why meditative piety grew in popularity to become a mode of spiritual activity advised not only to recluses and cenobites as in the writings of Aelred of Rievaulx, but also reached out to diverse lay audiences through the pastoral regimens prescribed by devotional authors such as the Carthusian prior Nicholas Love in England and the Parisian theologian and chancellor of the University of Paris, Jean Gerson.

Through exploring these texts from a variety of perspectives--theoretical, codicological, theological--and through tracing their complex lines of dissemination in ideological and material terms, this collection promises to be invaluable to students and scholars of medieval religious and literary culture.
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A History Of The Iconoclastic Controversy by Edward James Martin - 282 pages
This book reports the most famous dispute between the Church and the State over the presence of paintings, mosaics, and statues in churches, in the period from 717 to 843. In no other book was the Iconoclastic Controversy described in a more detailed way. An essential volume not only for those who are interested in the religious discourse, but also for those who want to approach a very peculiar historical and artistic period. This is a new edition of the Society of the Promotion of the Christian Knowledge 1930 publication.
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A Mendicant Sermon Collection from Composition to Reception: The 'Novum Opus Dominicale' of John Waldeby Oesa by Akae Yuichi, Yuichi Akae - 281 pages
This study analyzes in detail the Novum opus dominicale of John Waldeby, a member of the convent of the Augustinian friars in York. This unedited collection of some sixty sermons for Sundays and major feasts is extant in two manuscripts in the Bodleian Library (Oxford), MSS Laud misc. 77 and Bodley 687. The present study places the work and the preacher within the wider context of mendicant preaching as mass communication in the Middle Ages. In doing so, it focuses on the educational environment which encompasses conventual education and preaching to the laity, and on the library in which this model sermon collection was compiled and used, identifying the role and meticulous design of the mendicant library collection. Through a detailed examination of sermon form in conjunction with Robert of Basevorn's Forma praedicandi, it tries to disentangle the intricate considerations involved in the processes of sermon composition and reveals the strategies of interpretation and communication in the use of exempla and imagery in preaching. It investigates the careful organization of Waldeby's work as a cycle of sermons for an entire year. In this way, it makes possible a deeper understanding of a wide range of complex issues from composition to reception through the prism of this important fourteenth-century sermon collection.
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Religious Identities in the Levant from Alexander to Muhammed: Continuity and Change (Contextualizing the Sacred) by Michael Blömer - 310 pages
This volume addresses questions of continuity and change in the religious life of the Levant between Alexander's conquest of the Middle East until the end of the Umayyad period, a topic which has received growing attention over the last decade within the fields of ancient history, archaeology, philology, and religious studies. The volume pulls together the efforts of scholars from all of these fields, and its central concerns include the representations and expressions of religious identity in sacred architecture, iconography, and texts. These representations and expressions are explored through literature, inscriptions, and iconography, and though the architectural as well as the functional development of sanctuaries, churches, and mosques. The volume includes papers on themes such as definition, creation, dissolution, and interconnection between sacred sites, as well as access and audience. These developments are examined through the lenses of aspects of continuity and change in material and literary culture.

With a point of departure in the development of urban, sub-urban, and extra-urban sanctuaries, churches, and early mosques, as well as their associated cults and religions, the contributions in this volume explore the shaping and development of the religious identities of individuals, groups, and societies, and assess how these categories of religious identity were interrelated and shaped by a variety of circumstances. The volume aims at underlining the importance of interdisciplinary studies to the comprehensive understanding of this complex field and at opening up discussions of methodological and theoretical approaches which can be used across these disciplines.
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Religion, Nation and Democracy in the South Caucasus (Routledge Contemporary Russia and Eastern Europe Series) by Alexander Agadjanian - 296 pages
This book explores developments in the three major societies of the South Caucasus – Armenia, Azerbaijan and Georgia – focusing especially on religion, historical traditions, national consciousness, and political culture, and on how these factors interact. It outlines how, despite close geographical interlacement, common historical memories and inherited structures, the three countries have deep differences; and it discusses how development in all three nations has differed significantly from the countries’ declared commitments to democratic orientation and European norms and values. The book also considers how external factors and international relations continue to impact on the three countries.
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Beni Hassan: Volume I: The Tomb of Khnumhotep II by Naguib Kanawati, Linda Evans, Anna-Latifa Mourad - 82 pages
The magnificent tomb of Khnumhotep II has never been completely recorded in drawing and photographs since its pioneering publication by P. E. Newberry in 1893. This report comprises detailed coloured plates, complete line drawings as well as the translation and interpretation of all the scenes and inscriptions in the tomb. The commentary includes studies on the tomb architecture, the extensive biography of the owner, the represented arrival of the Asiatics, and the depicted flora and fauna.
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Dictionary of Greek and Roman Biography and Mythology 3 Volume Set in 6 Pieces (Cambridge Library Collection - Classics) by William Smith - 3772 pages
Originally published in three volumes between 1844 and 1849, this extensive reference work, illustrated with reproductions of ancient coins, embodies a wealth of nineteenth-century classical scholarship. Functioning as a highly readable guide to the whole of ancient Greek and Roman history and mythology, the work was edited by the eminent lexicographer and classicist Sir William Smith (1813-93). Knighted in 1892, Smith was one of the major figures responsible for the revival of classical teaching and scholarship in Britain. His Dictionary of Greek and Roman Antiquities (1842) is also reissued in this series. For the present work, Smith assembled a team of contributors but still wrote many of the entries himself. Each massive volume has been subdivided into two separately published parts for this reissue. Volume 1 contains entries from Abaeus to Dysponteus; Volume 2, entries from Earinus to Nyx; and Volume 3, entries from Oarses to Zygia.
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KE-RA-ME-JA: Studies Presented to Cynthia W. Shelmerdine (Prehistory Monographs) by Dimitri Nakassis - 336 pages
The title of this volume, ke-ra-me-ja in Linear B, was chosen because it means “potter” (Κεράμεια, from Greek κέραμος, “potter’s clay”) and combines two major strands of Cynthia Shelmerdine’s scholarship: Mycenaean ceramics and Linear B texts. It thereby signals her pioneering use of archaeological and textual data in a sophisticated and integrated way. The intellectual content of the essays demonstrate not only that her research has had wide-ranging influence, but also that it is a model of scholarship to be emulated.
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Thucydides History: Book 1 by P. J. Rhodes - 200 pages
With this edition of Book I P. J. Rhodes provides the ‘prequel’ to his editions of Thucydides’ books on the Archidamian War (II, III and IV.1–V.24). As before he provides an Introduction on Thucydides’ history and on the Peloponnesian War, a Greek text with selective critical apparatus and facing translation, and a commentary which should be useful both to specialists and to readers with little or no Greek, and which assumes no previous acquaintance with Thucydides. Matters of text and language are discussed where necessary, but the emphasis is on Thucydides’ subject-matter — the Peloponnesian War presented as the greatest war in Greek history, and accounts of the events directly leading to the war and of the growth of Athenian power since the Persian Wars which explain why this war between the two great powers of fifth-century Greece was fought — and on the way in which he has treated it.
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Animals in the Neolithic of Britain and Europe (Neolithic Studies Group Seminar Papers) by Dale Serjeantson, David Field - 192 pages
The twelve papers in this edited volume originated from the Neolithic Studies Group seminar held at the British Museum on 10th November 2003 on the subject of Animals in the Neolithic. This book includes most of the papers delivered and debated at the meeting and others contributed later. The aim of the book is to cover the range of current approaches to animals in the Neolithic, and to encompass as wide a geographical scope as possible in Europe. In particular, it is attempted to ensure that both wild and domestic animals are discussed and that their social as well as economic roles are given appropriate attention. Umberto Albarella, a discussant at the meeting in 2003, has rounded off the volume with a commentary and discussion on the papers which puts them into the perspective of changing views of animals in the Neolithic of Europe.
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Gournia, Vasiliki, and Other Prehistoric Sites on the Isthmus of Hierapetra, Crete: Excavations of the Wells-Houston-Cramp Expeditions 1901, 1903, 1904 by Harriet Boyd Hawes, Blanche A. Williams, Richard B. Seager, Edith H. Hall - 154 pages
This volume presents the primary archaeological report about the excavation of the Late Minoan I town of Gournia in eastern Crete, directed by Harriet Boyd Hawes at the beginning of the 20th century. This second edition presents exactly the same information and images as the first edition, but in a smaller, more user friendly format than the original elephantine book. Plans, pottery, and small finds among many other topics on the Bronze Age archaeology of eastern Crete are all included, just as in the first edition.
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Conserving Cultural Landscapes: Challenges and New Directions by Ken Taylor - 412 pages

New approaches to both cultural landscapes and historic urban landscapes increasingly recognize the need to guide future change, rather than simply protecting the fabric of the past. Challenging traditional notions of historic preservation, Conserving Cultural Landscapes takes a dynamic multifaceted approach to conservation. It builds on the premise that a successful approach to urban and cultural landscape conservation recognizes cultural as well as natural values, sustains traditional connections to place, and engages people in stewardship where they live and work. It brings together academics within the humanities and humanistic social sciences, conservation and preservation professionals, practitioners, and stakeholders to rethink the meaning and practice of cultural heritage conservation, encourage international cooperation, and stimulate collaborative research and scholarship.